Photo: Students study soil on a wooden desk.

Photograph by Kelly Thayer, MyShot

Did you know snapping mountain-top photos of smog and listening for frog calls can help scientists? Get ideas for how you can participate in citizen science—projects in which volunteers and scientists work together to answer real-world questions and gather data. Check out two of National Geographic's preeminent citizen science projects: the Great Nature Project and FieldScope.

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Photo: A small bird on a branch

Bird Count

Participate in a state-wide bird count by contacting your state's ornithological society.

Photo of a stream.

Monitor Water Quality

Volunteer to help monitor and protect the health of your local rivers, streams, and other bodies of water.

Close-up photo of a yellow-green frog.

Frog and Toad Populations

Survey frog and toad populations in your area by participating in the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program, which will teach you how to identify frogs and toads by their calls.

Photo: A red bird with black wings on a branch

Bird Census

Join the Audubon Society's Christmas Bird Count and contribute to a wildlife census that will help scientists assess the health of bird populations.

World Monitoring Day

Celebrate World Water Monitoring Day. Use a test kit to sample local bodies of water for water quality data and share the results with other communities around the world.

Photo: Star explosion

Search Space

Want a chance to have an interstellar dust particle named after you? Help NASA by volunteering for Stardust@home and searching images for tiny interstellar dust impacts.

Photo: Egret walking with fish in it's mouth.

Bird Watch

Join eBird, an online checklist project created by the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society. Ebird allows people to report real-time bird sightings and observations.

Photo of a bird's nest with eggs.

Monitor Bird Nests

Join NestWatch, a continent-wide project to monitor bird nests. The project was started by the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology and the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center.