Blizzards are strong winter storms. Snowfall is heavy and winds are strong. They can be dangerous. Sometimes, you cannot see very well. There have been many strong blizzards in the last few years. They have hit the East Coast of the United States. One was so bad it was called "Snowzilla." 

 

Humans Contribute to Climate Change


Weather is the day-to-day events in the atmosphere. It is the forecast for clouds and rain one day, and a sunny day the next. Blizzards are part of the weather. But they are affected by climate change. Climate change is the average weather of an area. It keeps track of 30 years of weather. Climate change is caused by humans. The gases, coal, and oil we burn release carbon dioxide. It is a greenhouse gas. The Earth needs it to stay warm. But too much carbon dioxide is making the Earth too hot. The temperature of the Earth is going up. 

 

Scientists say that climate change makes blizzards stronger. There is more water in the air when it is warm. More moisture goes into the air when the seas get warmer. This moisture falls back to Earth. It is the rain and snow. All of this moisture makes storms stronger. It also makes them happen more. This makes blizzards stronger. They happen where it still gets cold.

 

Changing Climate Conditions


Climate change affects ice and glaciers. Sea ice reflects sunlight. But the ice is melting in the Arctic. Now, the sunlight warms up the ocean. The hot seas make the ice melt more. It makes the Arctic warm up faster than other places. It also changes the weather in other parts of the world. Snow reflects sunlight. Less snow means more water. Dark ocean water absorbs sunlight. Water becomes warmer. More ice melts. This changes weather patterns in other parts of the world. It can cause severe winter weather. 

 

We can see the effect of global warming on the atmosphere. The jet stream is a fast-moving flow of air. It moves in the lowest region of the atmosphere. The stream moves fast when it is cold in the north and warm to the south. The warming Arctic makes the stream move slower. It stops moving in a straight path. It weaves north and south. This pulls Arctic air down from the north. Blizzards happen easily. So do polar vortex storms.

 

Maybe It’s Cold Outside

The aptly named blizzard "Snowzilla" hit the Northeastern United States in January of 2016, causing great damage to the area. 

Arctic amplification
Noun

phenomenon in which global warming causes the polar regions to increase in temperature faster than the rest of the world

Noun

layers of gases surrounding a planet or other celestial body.

Noun

force per unit area exerted by the mass of the atmosphere as gravity pulls it to Earth.

Noun

storm with high winds, intense cold, heavy snow, and little rain.

climate
Noun

all weather conditions for a given location over a period of time.

feedback loop
Noun

cycle of causes and effects where the effects either directly reinforce (in a positive feedback loop) or oppose (in a negative feedback loop) the original condition.

fossil fuel
Noun

coal, oil, or natural gas. Fossil fuels formed from the remains of ancient plants and animals.

greenhouse gas
Noun

gas in the atmosphere, such as carbon dioxide, methane, water vapor, and ozone, that absorbs solar heat reflected by the surface of the Earth, warming the atmosphere.

Noun

amount of water vapor in the air.

Noun

winds speeding through the upper atmosphere.

polar
Adjective

having to do with the North and/or South Pole.

Noun

cyclone located around the North Pole or the South Pole.

Noun

all forms in which water falls to Earth from the atmosphere.

tropical
Adjective

existing in the tropics, the latitudes between the Tropic of Cancer in the north and the Tropic of Capricorn in the south.

troposphere
Noun

lowest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, extending from the surface to about 16 kilometers (10 miles) above.

velocity
Noun

measurement of the rate and direction of change in the position of an object.

Noun

state of the atmosphere, including temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind, humidity, precipitation, and cloudiness.