Those who enjoy exploring the outdoors have a responsibility to protect these natural areas so others can continue to enjoy them in the future. However, some recreationists have had a negative impact on the environment. This is especially true for mountaineers who have climbed Mount Everest because much of what they take up the mountain never makes it back down.

 

In Lesson One, students will develop an understanding of the term peakbaggers and mapping the peaks of the Seven Summits. They will consider why mountaineers might want to be peakbaggers and how these climbers impact environments around the world. They will read about mountaineering and how the sport has evolved over time. Students will then learn about Everest and why some people are so excited to climb it.

 

In Lesson Two, students will explore the history of climbing Everest and then unpack what it takes to summit the mountain today. They will also consider what happens to the waste—organic as well as non-organic—and the impact it has had on the mountain over time.

 

Finally, in Lesson Three, students will consider the responsibility of the Nepalese and Chinese governments, and that of individual climbers, to protect Everest. They will end their work by drafting an infographic that educates the community about ethical mountain climbing based on a class created Everest Bill of Rights.

 

Use this unit at a glance to explore a brief outline of the materials included in this resource.

 

2 hrs 30 mins

Students develop an understanding of the term peakbaggers and map the peaks of the Seven Summits. They then consider three different reasons for mountaineering: exploration, recreation, or vocation. Finally, they read about mountaineering and how the sport has evolved over time creating a timeline to chart mountaineering developments from the late 1400s to the current century. This lesson is part of the Mount Everest: What Goes Up Should Come Down unit.

3 hrs

Students explore the history of climbing Mount Everest. Then, they unpack what it takes to summit Everest today, including the types of costs. Finally, students consider what happens to waste, both organic and non-organic, and how waste has impacted the mountain over time. This lesson is part of the Mount Everest: What Goes Up Should Come Down unit.

3 hrs 15 mins

Students identify responsibilities of the government and individual climbers to protect Mount Everest by reading examples of regulations already in place in Nepal, China, and other countries. Students use their research to guide the creation of an infographic meant to educate the community about ethical mountain climbing in a visually appealing, easy to read way. This lesson is part of the Mount Everest: What Goes Up Should Come Down unit.

alpinist
Noun

mountain climber specializing in high, difficult ascents.

Noun

the distance above sea level.

altitude sickness
Noun

illness caused by reduced oxygen levels at high elevations.

amateur
Adjective

person who studies and works at an activity or interest without financial benefit or being formally trained in it.

Bill of Rights
Noun

first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

biogas
Noun

fuel produced by bacteria helping to decompose organic material, such as plants and sewage.

citizen
Noun

member of a country, state, or town who shares responsibilities for the area and benefits from being a member.

citizenship
Noun

behavior of a person in terms of their community.

Noun

gradual changes in all the interconnected weather elements on our planet.

climb
Verb

to ascend or go up.

Noun

management of a natural resource to prevent exploitation, destruction, or neglect.

Noun

one of the seven main land masses on Earth.

ecotourism
Noun

act and industry of traveling for pleasure with concern for minimal environmental impact.

Noun

height above or below sea level.

expedition
Noun

journey with a specific purpose, such as exploration.

exploration
Noun

study and investigation of unknown places, concepts, or issues.

financial
Adjective

having to do with money.

geotourism
Noun

tourism that sustains or enhances the geographical character of a place—its environment, culture, aesthetics, heritage, and well-being of its residents.

global citizen
Noun

person who recognizes the rights and responsibilities, according to the UN Global Education First Initiative, "associated with the interconnected global challenges that call for far-reaching changes in how we think and act for the dignity of fellow human beings." 

infographic
Noun

visual representation of data. Also called information graphic or graphic.

initiative
Noun

first step or move in a plan.

land management
Noun

process of balancing the interests of development, resources, and sustainability for a region.

mapping
Noun

making and using maps.

Mount Everest
Noun

highest spot on Earth, approximately 8,850 meters (29,035 feet). Mount Everest is part of the Himalaya and straddles the border of Nepal and China.

mountaineer
Noun

someone who climbs mountains.

Oceania
Noun

region including island groups in the South Pacific.

peak
Noun

the very top.

peakbagger
Noun

mountain climber whose principal goal is the attainment of a summit, or specific set of summits that meet certain criteria of altitude of prominence.

personnel
Noun

employees or all people working toward a common goal.

physical
Adjective

having to do with the body.

recreational
Adjective

having to do with activities done for enjoyment.

refuse
Noun

trash, garbage.

regulation
Noun

rule or law.

responsibility
Noun

being accountable and reliable for an action or situation.

scale
Verb

climb up or reach the top of a mountain or other high point.

Sherpa
Noun

people and culture native to the Himalayan region of Nepal and China. Sherpa often serve as mountaineer guides and porters on mountain-climbing expeditions.

stewardship
Noun

responsible management to ensure benefits are passed on to future generations.

summit
Noun

highest point of a mountain.

summit
Verb

to reach the highest point of a mountain.

Noun

use of resources in such a manner that they will never be exhausted.

sustainable
Adjective

able to be continued at the same rate for a long period of time.

sustainable tourism
Noun

industry that seeks to have the least impact on the places and cultures visited, while contributing to the local economy.

technology
Noun

the science of using tools and complex machines to make human life easier or more profitable.

tourism
Noun

the industry (including food, hotels, and entertainment) of traveling for pleasure.

trace
Noun

surviving mark or evidence.

vocational
Adjective

having to do with instruction or guidance in an occupation or career.