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On October 1, 1903, the Boston Americans and the Pittsburgh Pirates began the first game of Major League Baseball’s first World Series. The Boston Americans, who later changed their name to the Boston Red Sox, won the best-of-nine series.
 
Six future Hall of Famers played in the first World Series, the most famous being Americans pitcher Cy Young and Pirates slugger Honus Wagner. Today, the Cy Young Award honors the best pitchers in Major League Baseball. Wagner, often considered the greatest shortstop in baseball history, was actually injured and did not play to his potential during the World Series. He refused any accolades regarding the series: “What does it profit a man to hammer along and make a few hits when they are not needed only to fall down when it comes to a pinch?”
 
Baseball fanaticism was no stranger to the first World Series. Boston’s “Royal Rooters” traveled to Pittsburgh to taunt the Pirates—and Boston won three out of the four games held in Pittsburgh.
accolade
Noun

award or honor.

competition
Noun

contest between organisms for resources, recognition, or group or social status.

fanaticism
Noun

irrational, obsessive, or out-of-proportion devotion to something.

injure
Verb

to hurt or cause harm.

Major League Baseball
Noun

organization that regulates the sport of baseball in the United States and Canada.

potential
Noun

possibility.

profit
Noun

money earned after production costs and taxes are subtracted.

shortstop
Noun

baseball position covering the infield between second and third base.

slugger
Noun

person who is a strong hitter.

taunt
Verb

to mock or provoke by teasing.

travel
Noun

movement from one place to another.

More Dates in History

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