On November 25, 1968, American journalist and author Upton Sinclair died in Bound Brook, New Jersey. Sinclair wrote 90 books, but his most famous is The Jungle. In The Jungle, Sinclair exposed the unhealthy and inhumane conditions in the American meatpacking industry. The publication of this book in 1906 caused a public outcry, and led to the passage of the first food-safety laws in the United States. After an investigation into the conditions described in Sinclair’s book, the government passed the Pure Food and Drug Act and Meat Inspection Act, and created the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to make sure food produced in the U.S. was safe to eat.
 
The FDA continues to play an important role in determining what foods and medicines are safe to consume. Chemists, biologists, and pharmacists now analyze genetically modified foods as well as imported goods.
analyze
Verb

to study in detail.

biologist
Noun

scientist who studies living organisms.

chemist
Noun

person who studies the theory and application of atoms and molecules, and their relationships and interactions.

consume
Verb

to use up.

expose
Verb

to uncover.

FDA
adjective, noun

(Food and Drug Administration) United States government agency responsible for "protecting the public health by assuring the safety, efficacy and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation."

Noun

material, usually of plant or animal origin, that living organisms use to obtain nutrients.

government
Noun

system or order of a nation, state, or other political unit.

import
Verb

to bring in a good or service from another area for trade.

journalist
Noun

person who reports and distributes news.

meat
Noun

animal flesh eaten as food.

medicine
Noun

substance used for treating illness or disease.

public
Adjective

available to an entire community, not limited to paying members.