On July 23, 1982, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) voted to ban commercial whaling, the hunting and killing of whales for profit. This radically reduced the whaling industry, but did not eliminate it. Many countries are not members of the IWC and are not bound by its rules. Canada, for instance, is not a member of the IWC, and allows some Inuit communities to hunt whales on a limited basis. Denmark regulates whaling on the Faroe Islands.

Many countries allow small-scale whaling, mostly tied to indigenous cultural practices. Some island nations in the Caribbean, such as Dominica and Grenada, have small whaling fleets. Two Indonesian communities continue to practice whaling traditions. A few Native American communities in the United States and Russia are allowed to hunt a certain number of whales every year.

Today, the governments of Japan, Norway, and Iceland have the world’s largest whaling fleets. These countries say they only hunt whales for scientific research.

ban
Verb

to prohibit, or not allow.

commercial
Adjective

having to do with the buying and selling of goods and services.

fleet
Noun

group of ships, usually organized for military purposes.

Adjective

characteristic to or of a specific place.

Inuit
Noun

people and culture native to the Arctic region of Canada, Greenland, and the U.S. state of Alaska.

Noun

political unit made of people who share a common territory.

profit
Noun

money earned after production costs and taxes are subtracted.

regulate
Verb

to determine and administer a set of rules for an activity.

research
Noun

scientific observations and investigation into a subject, usually following the scientific method: observation, hypothesis, prediction, experimentation, analysis, and conclusion.

whaling
Noun

industry of hunting whales.

More Dates in History

July
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 1 2 3 4
More Events on this Date