On February 8, 1971, the world’s first electronic stock exchange, NASDAQ, opened for business. Today, NASDAQ is the second-largest stock exchange in the world, second only to its Wall Street neighbor, the New York Stock Exchange.
 
NASDAQ’s accessible electronic format changed stock trading forever. It lowered the “spread”—the difference between the price a broker is willing to pay a client for a stock (the “bid price”) and the price at which a broker is willing to sell a stock to a client (the “ask price”). 
 
NASDAQ is still associated with technology, and has an office in Silicon Valley, California. With its slogan “the stock market for the next hundred years,” NASDAQ was the first stock market in the U.S. to start trading online, in 1998. 
accessible
Adjective

relatively easy to approach, use, or obtain.

ask price
Noun

lowest price a seller is willing to accept for a good. Also called an offer price.

bid price
Noun

highest price a buyer is willing to pay for a good.

broker
Noun

person who buys or sells goods on behalf of another person, in return for a commission.

NASDAQ
Noun

(National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations System) American electronic stock exchange.

Silicon Valley
Noun

region in central California (mostly Santa Clara County) where the headquarters of many technology companies are located.

slogan
Noun

motto or phrase associated with an organization or individual.

stock exchange
Noun

place where investments (stocks) in goods are bought and sold.

technology
Noun

the science of using tools and complex machines to make human life easier or more profitable.

Wall Street
Noun

leading financial district in the U.S., named after the street in lower Manhattan, New York City, where the New York Stock Exchange and many large investment firms are located.