On February 10, 1763, the United Kingdom, France, and Spain signed the Treaty of Paris. The treaty marked the end of the Seven Years' War (the colonial portion was called the French and Indian War). In the treaty, France lost many colonies to the British, including Canada and West Florida in North America. Spain received the French district of Louisiana.
 
Though the treaty proved to be the end of most of France's colonies in the Western Hemisphere, their influence remains. Many French settlers remained in the now-British colonies. In the Canadian province of Quebec, French food, language, and culture remain dominant. Similar cultural preservation can be seen in the state of Louisiana, where Cajun and Creole cultures incorporate the region’s French, West African, Caribbean, Native American, Spanish, British, and American influences.
Cajun
Noun

people of French-speaking ancestry native to the Gulf Coast region of the United States, mostly the coast of Louisiana.

colony
Noun

people and land separated by distance or culture from the government that controls them.

Creole
Noun

people and culture of the Native American, French, Caribbean, African, and Spanish settlers of the American Gulf Coast, especially the state of Louisiana.

culture
Noun

learned behavior of people, including their languages, belief systems, social structures, institutions, and material goods.

influence
Verb

to encourage or persuade a person or organization to act a certain way.

Noun

protection from use.

Noun

division of a country larger than a town or county.

settler
Noun

person who migrates and establishes a residence in a largely unpopulated area.

treaty
Noun

official agreement between groups of people.

Western Hemisphere
Noun

area of the Earth west of the prime meridian and east of the International Date Line.

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