On April 7, 1948, the United Nations established the World Health Organization (WHO) with headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO was the first UN agency to which every member-state subscribed. The health-care professionals and managers of the WHO are recognized for providing emergency medical assistance in times of natural or man-made disasters, as well as administering programs that have helped lead to the eradication of smallpox and a radical reduction in worldwide cases of polio.
 
Today, the World Health Organization has targeted the spread of communicable diseases such as malaria and AIDS. To combat these diseases, the WHO works with local health-care providers, research scientists, and drug manufacturers. This cooperation recognizes that “health is a shared responsibility, involving equitable access to essential care and collective defense against transnational threats.”
combat
Verb

to fight.

cooperation
Noun

the act of working together.

disaster
Noun

terrible and damaging event.

eradicate
Verb

to destroy or remove.

malaria
Noun

infectious disease caused by a parasite carried by mosquitoes.

manufacture
Verb

to make or produce a good, usually for sale.

reduction
Noun

lowering.

research
Noun

scientific observations and investigation into a subject, usually following the scientific method: observation, hypothesis, prediction, experimentation, analysis, and conclusion.

smallpox
Noun

very contagious, often fatal disease wiped out with vaccination programs.

transnational
Adjective

having to do with issues, people, or organizations from different countries.

United Nations
Noun

international organization that works for peace, security and cooperation.

World Health Organization (WHO)
Noun

United Nations agency responsible for health.