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On April 26, 1822, Fredrick Law Olmsted was born in Hartford, Connecticut. Olmsted is often considered the “father of American landscape architecture,” having designed public spaces all over the country.
 
Olmsted’s most famous design is probably New York City’s Central Park, one of the largest urban parks in the country. Central Park displays many of Olmsted’s signature design elements: public “green space” accessible to everyone regardless of income or social class; a variety of landscapes, including trees, lawns, and lakes; and an emphasis on conservation of an area’s natural features.
 
In addition to Central Park, Olmsted also designed the oldest state park in the U.S., Niagara Falls State Park in Niagara Falls, New York. His “Emerald Necklace” is a series of parks and waterways ringing the cities of Boston and Brookline, Massachusetts. Olmstead also designed college campuses, such as Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, and Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama. 
accessible
Adjective

relatively easy to approach, use, or obtain.

architecture
Noun

style and design of buildings or open spaces.

class
Noun

division in society based on income and type of employment.

college campus
Noun

physical space, including the buildings and classrooms, of a college or university.

Noun

management of a natural resource to prevent exploitation, destruction, or neglect.

consider
Verb

to think about.

construction
Noun

arrangement of different parts.

display
Verb

to show or reveal.

emphasis
Noun

special stress or importance attached to something.

income
Noun

wages, salary, or amount of money earned.

Noun

the geographic features of a region.

landscape architect
Noun

person who plans, designs, and oversees the construction of open spaces such as gardens.

public
Adjective

available to an entire community, not limited to paying members.

signature
Adjective

unique identifying feature or characteristic.

waterway
Noun

body of water that serves as a route for transportation.