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National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellowship

National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellowship  

To help save wildlife and sound the alarm for lesser-known species at risk, the National Geographic Society and Zoological Society of London (ZSL) created the National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellowships. The program provides funding, training, and capacity development to two active cohorts of Fellows from Latin America and Asia who are working to protect some of the regions' most at-risk animals that are featured in the Photo Ark.

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Meet the Edge Fellows

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Adrian Lyngdoh
Conservation Biologist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Adrian Lyngdoh
 Conservation Biologist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Adrian Lyngdoh is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow focusing on the Bengal slow loris. Adrian has an M.Sc. in ecology and environmental sciences from Pondicherry University, India, and is currently a junior research biologist at the Sálim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History. Adrian’s project aims to study the population status and demography of the Bengal slow loris as well as the threats the species is facing, in order to support its conservation in Maghalaya, northeast India.

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Alifa Haque
Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Alifa Haque
 Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Alifa Haque is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow focusing on the critically endangered largetooth sawfish. Alifa has an M.S. in zoology (fisheries) from the University of Dhaka, where she is also a zoology lecturer. She has been working in shark and ray conservation in Bangladesh for the last two and a half years. During this time, she has worked hard to gain the trust of local fishermen and traders. Alifa’s project aims to provide rigorous information on critical sawfish habitats and trade chains as well as improve the reporting of incidental sawfish catches by developing a cell phone reporting system. 

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Ashish Bashyal
Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Ashish Bashyal
 Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Ashish Bashyal is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow focusing on the critically endangered gharial. In his current role as chief conservation officer at the Biodiversity Conservancy Nepal, Ashish oversees a number of active research and conservation projects. His project aims to collect previously nonexistent, baseline scientific information on various ecological attributes of gharial populations in Nepal’s Bardia National Park to assess their conservation status.

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Ayushi Jain
Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Ayushi Jain
 Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Ayushi Jain is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow focusing on the endangered Cantor’s giant softshell turtle. Ayushi is currently studying for a master’s in ecology and environmental sciences. Her primary research interests lie in community ecology, behavioural ecology, and evolution of various morphological and physiological traits in reptiles. Ayushi’s project aims to collect baseline ecological data for Cantor’s giant softshell turtle and its habitat at locations in three South Indian states, and to use this data to develop a Conservation Action Plan for the species.

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Daniel Arauz
Wildlife Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Daniel Arauz
 Wildlife Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Daniel Arauz Naranjo manages a sea turtle project at Costa Rica’s Rescue Center for Endangered Marine Species (CREMA), where he catches, tags, and monitors sea turtles in foraging grounds in Costa Rica. He also coordinates a sustainable fisheries project, working with local fishermen to promote science and conservation. Back
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David Quimpo
Conservation Specialist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
David Quimpo
 Conservation Specialist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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David Quimpo is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow focusing on the critically endangered Rufous-headed Hornbill. David has acted as a conservation specialist for the Haribon Foundation in the Philippines since 2012. In this role, he assists with policy writing at both the local and national level, and trains community-based forest protection teams. David’s project aims to use the rufous-headed hornbill as an umbrella and keystone species to sustainably protect and conserve the biodiversity of the Central Panay Mountains in Panay Island.

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Ginelle Gacasan
Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Ginelle Gacasan
 Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Ginelle Gacasan is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow focusing on the endangered green turtle. Ginelle currently works at Community Centred Conservation Philippines Inc., where she previously implemented a program to establish a dugong sanctuary through community participation. She recently started studying for an M.Sc. at the University of the Philippines. Ginelle’s project aims to document traditional ecological knowledge from the indigenous Calamian Tagbanwa tribe about the green turtle and its seagrass habitat, and to use this knowledge to make conservation recommendations. 

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Ha Hoang
Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Ha Hoang
 Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Ha Hoang is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow focused on the endangered big-headed turtle. Ha studied for an M.Sc. in environmental management before joining the Asian Turtle Program in 2008, where he is currently the Vietnam turtle program coordinator. His ambition is to save all of Vietnam’s native tortoise and freshwater turtle species from the threat of extinction. Ha’s project aims to increase local conservation capacity in Vietnam, better understand the risks of disease transfer between released turtles and wild turtle populations as well as other threats to the species, and increase awareness of turtle conservation.

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Hanh Ngo
Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Hanh Ngo
 Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Hanh Ngo is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow. Hanh is currently a master’s student and research assistant in the Department of Genetics at Vietnam National University. She previously contributed to fieldwork for the Asian Turtle Program, including surveys on the Vietnamese pond turtle and the Yangtze giant softshell turtle. Hanh’s project aims to develop an advanced eDNA protocol to support survey efforts of the endangered Chinese crocodile lizard in northeastern Vietnam.

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Jailabdeen A
Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Jailabdeen A
 Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Jailabdeen A is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow focusing on the critically endangered gharial. Jailabdeen is currently a project coordinator for the Gharial Ecology Project at the Madras Crocodile Bank Trust. He is studying for a Ph.D. in animal science from Bharathidasan University. Jailabdeen’s project aims to develop a comprehensive assessment of gharials in India’s National Chambal Sanctuary, their riverine habitats, and threats and challenges to their survival.

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Jamal Galves
Wildlife Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Jamal Galves
 Wildlife Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Jamal Galves, a Nat Geo Photo Ark EDGE Fellow, has been passionate about manatee conservation since he was 11 years old, and later jumped at the opportunity to join manatee scientists at Sea to Shore Alliance to assist with manatee captures and health assessments. In his time at Sea to Shore Alliance, he has risen in the ranks from field assistant to program coordinator for the Belize Manatee Conservation Program. Back
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Jonathan Phu Jiun Lang
Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Jonathan Phu Jiun Lang
 Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Jonathan Phu is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow focusing on the endangered green turtle. He is a conservation officer at the Marine Research Foundation in Malaysia and is currently studying for an M.Sc. in marine science at Universiti Malaysia Sabah. Jonathan’s project aims to provide an assessment on the population status of foraging sea turtles in Mantanani Island to Sabah Parks, a government organization responsible for establishing marine parks.

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Marina Rivero
Wildlife Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Marina Rivero
 Wildlife Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Marina Rivero Hernandez is currently studying for a master’s degree at El Colegio de la Frontera Sur. She has contributed to a number of research projects focusing on a variety of mammal species in Mexico. She is a Nat Geo Photo Ark EDGE Fellow. Her EDGE project will be part of the tapir recovery program in the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and will be carried out in collaboration with the National Commission of Natural Protected Areas and Centro GEO. Back
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Moumita Chakraborty
Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Moumita Chakraborty
 Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Moumita Chakraborty is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow focusing on the endangered red panda. She is studying for a Ph.D. in wildlife science from Saurashtra University, in affiliation with the Wildlife Institute of India. She is currently carrying out field research to investigate red panda ecology in the Sikkim Himalayas in India. Her project aims to understand and evaluate the species-habitat relationship of the red panda across both protected and unprotected areas.  

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Otgontuya Batsuuri
Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Otgontuya Batsuuri
 Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Otgontuya Batsuuri is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow focusing on the critically endangered Siberian crane. Since graduating with a B.Sc. in biology from the National University of Mongolia, Otgontuya has worked as a biology and chemistry teacher at a local private school. Her project aims to identify potential summering areas of Siberian cranes, and to gather knowledge that is critical to the recovery of the species.

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Ranjana Bhatta
Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Ranjana Bhatta
 Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Ranjana Bhatta is a National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow focusing on the critically endangered gharial. Ranjana currently works in the environmental science department at Tribhuvan University in Nepal, focusing on aquatic ecology. She previously worked as a climate change consultant for the Nepal Ministry of Science. Ranjana’s project aims to undertake research that will support the science-driven in-situ conservation of the critically endangered gharial by providing detailed, evidence-based information.

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Vinicius Alberici
Wildlife Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Vinicius Alberici
 Wildlife Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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While studying for his Ph.D., Vinicius Alberici Roberto has been collaborating with the Brazilian NGO ICAS (Institute for the Conservation of Wild Animals) to contribute to the Anteaters and Highways Project, which aims to assess the impact of roads on giant anteater populations in the Brazilian Cerrado. Back
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Yajaira García Feria
Wildlife Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
Yajaira García Feria
 Wildlife Conservationist, National Geographic Photo Ark EDGE Fellow
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Conservationist Yajaira Garcia Feria is a Nat Geo Photo Ark EDGE Fellow. She studies the volcano rabbit, one of the smallest species of rabbit in the world that is found only on four volcanoes in Mexico. During her master’s degree, she worked with Mexico’s National Commission of Protected Natural Areas on an initiative to implement a monitoring system for volcano rabbits across their range. She has also contributed to a number of research projects at the National Autonomous University of Mexico focused on the biology and ecology of captive volcano rabbits. Back

Conservation Heroes

Many species in the Photo Ark are at risk in the wild due to habitat loss, illegal poaching, and other threats. National Geographic is actively funding conservationists in the field to help some of these species in most critical need. Meet some of the conservation heroes who are helping protect wildlife and find out how you can take action to help.

Olivier Nsengimana and the Grey Crowned Crane

Having grown up enjoying the sights and sounds of cranes dancing in the marsh, Olivier Nsengimana was shocked to learn as an adult of their drastic decline. In Rwanda and elsewhere, juvenile wild cranes and eggs are illegally caught, sold, and confined to solitary futures as status symbols for humans.


Kalyar Platt and the Burmese Star Tortoise

There’s a belief around Minzontaung Wildlife Sanctuary in Myanmar that Earth spirits protect tortoises and wreak vengeance on those who harm them. That makes it an ideal place for National Geographic grantee Kalyar Platt and team to release hundreds of captive-bred Burmese star tortoises.


Jia Zhong and the Chinese Merganser

While most Chinese mergansers breed in Russia’s Far East, they fly south to China for the winter. Jia Zhong and her colleagues work with hundreds of birdwatchers across China to locate, study, and protect the rivers that harbor these endangered birds.


Corinne Kendall and the White-Backed Vulture

Corinne Kendall and staff from the Wildlife Conservation Society are satellite-tracking white-backed vultures in southern Tanzania where the population is still strong. The data they collect will reveal the range, breeding areas, habitat use, and likely causes of death for the birds.


Carlton Ward Jr. and the Florida Panther

Carlton Ward Jr. works with scientists and landowners in Florida’s wildest areas to highlight opportunities to benefit panthers and people. By connecting the public to panthers using photos and outreach, he seeks to encourage the habitat protection needed to expand the panther population and keep Florida wild.

Zoo Success Stories

Picture of Photo Ark Zoo kiosk rendering

Zoos and wildlife sanctuaries around the world are home to some of the most critically endangered species. Some of these species are no longer found in the wild and programs at zoos and wildlife sanctuaries may be the last hope for saving them. Research and fundraising conducted by conservationists at these facilities help to not only protect the animals in their care, but also those in the wild. Thanks to this important work, zoos and wildlife sanctuaries are beacons of hope for species at risk.

Find a Photo Ark exhibition near you.

National Geographic EDGE Fellows: Robin Moore

Help Us Save Wildlife

Thousands of species are at risk and time is running out. Join National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore as he leads the Photo Ark project to document our planet’s biodiversity and find innovative solutions to help save threatened species and protect their critical habitats.