Search
National Geographic
Search

Photo Ark Education Events

Learn about explorer-led conservation education projects from around the world


Photo Ark Challenge Event

Java, Indonesia

Students participated in a BioBlitz where they honed their species identification techniques and showcased what they learned through writing, photography, and drawing.

 

Photograph by Rahayu Oktaviani

The joy of children seeing certain species is contagious, and it helps me to keep doing my work.

Screen capture from group photo taken at Mirza Kusrini's Photo Ark Challenge event in Indonesia, November 2017.

Mirza Kusrini
National Geographic Explorer, Herpetologist

Student Work

<p>A species identification&nbsp;logbook&nbsp;entry&nbsp;by Kay, age 13.</p>

A species identification logbook entry by Kay, age 13.

<p>A species profile about the Silvery gibbon&nbsp;by Yla, age 14.</p>

A species profile about the Silvery gibbon by Yla, age 14.

<p>&ldquo;Butterflies,&rdquo; a&nbsp;closing reflection&nbsp;by Tata, age 13. The closing text&nbsp;next to&nbsp;the stars&nbsp;in&nbsp;English:&nbsp;&ldquo;I&#39;m getting bolder with frogs and other things I was afraid of.&rdquo;</p>

“Butterflies,” a closing reflection by Tata, age 13. The closing text next to the stars in English: “I'm getting bolder with frogs and other things I was afraid of.”


Photo Ark Challenge event

Maroantsetra, Madagascar

Students went on nature hikes, created masks of species they saw along the way, and made a movie highlighting local endangered species and habitats.

 

Photograph by Cortni Borgerson

Children are the key to conservation. We can forge a generation of citizens that are socially active and environmentally aware.

Picture of Cortni Borgerson

Cortni Borgerson
National Geographic Explorer, Anthropologist

Student Work

Picture of lemur mask made by V. Edico, age 13

A lemur mask made by V. Edico, age 13

Photograph by Cortni Borgerson

Picture of frog mask made by R. H. Faniah at the Photo Ark Challenge event in Madagascar

Picture of frog mask made by R. H. Faniah at the Photo Ark Challenge event in Madagascar.

Photograph by Cortni Borgerson


Photo Ark Challenge event

Karura Forest, Kenya

Students learned about endemic species, practiced identification techniques with rangers, and performed conservation themed skits.

 

The “Eagles Are Cool” Photo Ark Challenge team at a waterfall in Karura Forest, Nairobi, Kenya.

Photograph by Washington Wachira

Everyone was very happy with the experience and many students were asking about how they can become scientists and rangers!

None

Washington Wachira
National Geographic Explorer, Conservationist

Student Work

University students playing the roles of rangers and tourists in their ecotourism skit.

Photograph by Wilfred Savali

Winners and judges of the "best actress" award. 

Photograph by Wilfred Savali

The Eagles team coming up with song lyrics for the music competition.

Photograph by Jordan Lim


Photo Ark Challenge Event

Ek' Balam, Mexico

Students went on night hikes, set camera traps, created conservation murals, and presented them to the community. 

 

None

In my experience, girls don’t want to get dirty and collect specimens in the field. But these girls were hands on with everything from bats to bugs. They were warriors!

Daniela Cafagii
National Geographic Explorer, Biologist

Student Work

Pricila and Russel making murals of local bird species.

Photograph by Jordan Lim

Students presenting their murals in the town center.

Photograph by Jordan Lim

Magazine

Traverse

“My intention is to use my photos and the selected quotes to inspire people to become more conscientious by getting their mind turning, but not limiting the direction of thought. I want to provide the launch pad from which the viewer’s mind can take flight. Conservation is a process that relies on the contributions of the individual as stepping stones in the direction of relief. Through exposing people to the sights of nature and the many species who share this earth, I hope to inspire at least one action in the direction of positive change.”

— Jillian S., 17, from Cincinnati, Ohio