Herd immunity, otherwise known as community immunity or the herd effect, is the way in which an entire community can be protected from an illness by immunizing a certain percentage of individuals. If enough people in the population are immune to a disease, then it is no longer able to spread, thus shielding those who are unprotected. 

 

Illness and Immunity


Diseases occur when people are infected with pathogens like bacteria or viruses. A person’s immune system detects these intruders and responds by producing antibodies that fight the pathogen. Illnesses can be passed from person to person, and if enough people get sick it can lead to an outbreak. However, if a particular number of people in a population are immune, then the pathogen’s chain of transmission is broken, and the disease cannot be passed around as easily. As a result, the disease becomes rarer over time and can even be eliminated altogether.

 

There are two ways people can become immune to a disease: through natural exposure or through vaccination. In both cases, the human immune system recognizes any pathogens that it has been exposed to before and is able to produce antibodies much faster to ward off sickness. This is why an adult who has already had chickenpox as a child is unlikely to contract the disease a second time.

 

Natural exposure to a disease is one way of achieving immunity, but it is risky for obvious reasons: it relies on getting sick in the first place, in the hopes that the immune system is strong enough to fight the illness and recover. Vaccination, on the other hand, is a relatively safe and effective option for immunization.

 

Kill or Cure


The first vaccine was discovered by an English scientist named Edward Jenner in the eighteenth century. During this period, smallpox was a common disease that killed countless people and left those who survived with disfiguring scars. Jenner noticed that milkmaids who had contracted cowpox (a similar but less aggressive disease) did not seem to get sick during smallpox outbreaks. He theorized that the two viruses were similar enough that exposure to cowpox would immunize an individual against smallpox.

 

Jenner decided to test his theory by inoculating a young boy with cowpox. He extracted pus from the blister of a milkmaid infected with cowpox and wiped it into a cut on the boy’s arm. The boy fell ill, but soon recovered. Jenner then purposely infected the boy with the deadly smallpox virus. Luckily for the boy, Jenner’s theory was correct: His exposure to cowpox had made him immune and he did not contract the disease.

 

Thankfully, medical science has come a long way since then. Today’s vaccines work by injecting a weakened or modified version of a pathogen to stimulate an immune response without inducing sickness. If an individual is exposed to the target pathogen in the real world, then that person’s immune system already knows how to make the antibodies required to fight off the disease.

 

Vaccination is a relatively safe and uncomplicated way to confer herd immunity, but it is not without drawbacks. Vaccines carry a risk of allergic reactions and unwanted side effects, and not everyone is a suitable candidate. For certain demographics, such as immune compromised people, the risks of vaccination often outweigh the benefits.

 

Safety in Numbers


For herd immunity to take effect, a certain percentage of the population must be immunized. This threshold of how many people are required to stop a disease from spreading is different for every disease and depends on many factors, including how easily it spreads and who it infects.

 

One of the statistics used to calculate this threshold is the “basic reproduction number” of a pathogen, known as R0. It represents the number of people one contagious person can infect in a community of unprotected individuals. The more contagious a disease is, the higher R0 will be, and the more people need to be immunized for herd immunity to take effect.

 

For example, measles is a highly contagious virus that can quickly be spread through the air. It has an R0 of 12–18 and requires 95 percent of the population to be vaccinated before herd immunity kicks in. Polio, on the other hand, is less contagious and has an R0 of 5–7, meaning that only 80–85 percent of the population needs to be immunized against polio for herd immunity to work.

 

Why Does it Matter?


Thanks to the effects of herd immunity, vaccines protect more people than just the individuals who receive them. If enough members of the population are immunized, then people who cannot receive vaccines are less likely to get sick.

 

For example, seasonal influenza is a contagious disease that kills thirty-six thousand people per year in the United States alone. While having the flu is unpleasant at the best of times, it is potentially deadly for people with weakened immune systems, including children and the elderly. Flu shots are available, but their effectiveness depends on a strong immune response. As a result, the vaccine is least effective at immunizing those who need it most: people with weakened immune systems. If strong and healthy people get vaccinated, then flu outbreaks can be contained, and vulnerable demographics are protected.

 

Herd immunity is important because it contains outbreaks and protects the most vulnerable members of society from potentially deadly diseases. It is impossible to vaccinate every single person on the planet, but if enough people are vaccinated, then herd immunity can lead to diseases being stamped out entirely. Thanks to vaccinations and the herd effect, smallpox was officially declared as eradicated in 1980—almost two centuries after Edward Jenner discovered the first vaccine.  Unfortunately, the growth of the anti-vaccination movement in recent decades has led to a resurgence in deadly childhood illnesses such as measles and pertussis.

 

Herd Immunity: Strength in Numbers

Arguments against vaccination are not based in peer-reviewed scientific research or evidence, but have risen steeply in popularity since the mid-20th century, and have resulted in the resurgence of preventable, once-eradicated diseases like measles.

antibody
Noun

molecule that help fight disease and infection.

disease
Noun

harmful condition of a body part or organ.

immune system
Noun

network of chemicals and organs that protects the body from disease.

immunity
Noun

condition of being resistant to disease or liability.

pathogen
Noun

organism that causes a disease, such as a virus.

vaccination
Noun

innoculation with a vaccine, or modified microorganism, to prevent disease.