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WITNESS. ILLUMINATE. ACT.

Jan 14-17, 2019

Washington, D.C.

The National Geographic Storytellers Summit is a multiday celebration for written and visual storytellers whose craft changes people’s understanding of the world. Hear from influential and award-winning photographers, filmmakers, journalists, and data visualizers who witness the major events of our time, illuminate critical issues, and inspire action. Together, their powerful stories help us further understand each other and our world.

 

Jan. 17 SPECIAL CONVERSATION WITH MULTIMEDIA ARTIST
TARYN SIMON

2019 Summit Speakers

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Taryn Simon
Taryn Simon
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Taryn Simon directs our attention to familiar systems of organization—bloodlines, criminal investigations, mourning, flower arrangements—making visible the contours of power and authority hidden within. Incorporating mediums ranging from photography and sculpture to text, sound, and performance, her projects are shaped by years of rigorous research and planning, including obtaining access from institutions as varied as Central Zionist Archives, Playboy Enterprises, and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Simon’s honors include the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in Photography and a Photo London Master of Photography award. Her works have been the subject of exhibitions and live in permanent collections of museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, in New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Tate Modern, London; Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow; Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; and the Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin.

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Tomas Ayuso
Tomas Ayuso
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Honduran journalist and documentary photographer Tomas Ayuso’s work focuses on Latin American conflict as it relates to the drug war, displacement, and urban dispossession. He seeks to bind disparate threads of communities into the grand interlinked story of the Western Hemisphere. In covering the issues facing the region’s diverse peoples, he hopes to create a visual record of continental struggles and local successes. Ayuso holds an MA in conflict and development from the New School. He’s an Open Society Foundation grantee, a Magnum Foundation Fellow, and a National Geographic Explorer. Currently, he’s working on along-term project on the Honduran collapse, The Right to Grow Old.

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Caitlin Bailey
Caitlin Bailey
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Caitlin Bailey is a wildlife filmmaker and photographer. She participated in the National Geographic Second Assistant Program, working with photographer David Liittschwager and NOAA to photograph plankton and microplastics in Hawaii. Additionally, Bailey works with the Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration as a videographer aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, exploring the deep ocean. She also produced photos and videos during the NOAA Hidden Ocean 2016: Chukchi Borderlands expedition to the Arctic. Bailey has a master of fine arts in science and natural history filmmaking from Montana State University and a bachelor of science in animal biology from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi.

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Alexandra Bell
Alexandra Bell
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Alexandra Bell is a multidisciplinary artist who investigates the complexities of narrative, information consumption, and perception. Using various media, she deconstructs language and imagery to explore the tension between marginal experiences and dominant histories. Through investigative research, she considers the ways media frameworks construct memory and inform discursive practices around race, politics, and culture. Her work has been exhibited widely, including at MoMA PS1, Koenig & Clinton Gallery, the Nathan Cummings Foundation, Atlanta Contemporary, and the Pomona College Museum of Art. She received the 2018 International Center of Photography Infinity Award in the applied category and is a 2018 Soros Equality Fellow. She lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

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Dominic Bracco II
Dominic Bracco II
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Dominic Bracco II is a screenwriter, playwright, installation artist, and journalist. His experiences growing up in South Texas with family members who were traffickers, coyotes, and Border Patrol agents led him to focus on the region for the last decade. His series of multidisciplinary projects on the U.S.-Mexico borderlands earned him a Tim Hetherington Visionary Award, a W. Eugene Smith fellowship, a National Geographic Exploration Grant, Pulitzer Center grants, and a Chris Hondros Fund Award. Bracco’s reporting has appeared in National Geographic magazine, The New York Times Magazine, Harper’s, and other leading publications. He is a founding member of the collective Prime.

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Kate Brooks
Kate Brooks
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Kate Brooks is an international photojournalist and filmmaker who chronicled conflict and human rights issues for nearly two decades before turning her lens to conservation issues. Her photographs have been extensively published in Time, Newsweek, Smithsonian, and The New Yorke rand exhibited in galleries and museums around the world. As a Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan in 2012-13, she researched the global wildlife trafficking crisis before embarking on directing her first film, The Last Animals, which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2017 and was awarded the Terra Mater Factual Studios Impact Award at Wildscreen in 2018.

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Andrea Bruce
Andrea Bruce
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Andrea Bruce is an award-winning documentary photographer whose work focuses on people living in the aftermath of war, concentrating on the social issues that are sometimes ignored and often ignited in war’s wake. For over 15 years, she has chronicled the world’s most troubled areas, focusing on Asia and the Middle East. For eight years, she worked as a staff photographer for the Washington Post and was both a Harvard Nieman Fellow and, in 2018, a CatchLight Fellow. She is now a National Geographic Explorer and the president of photo agency NOOR.

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Catherine Chalmers
Catherine Chalmers
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Catherine Chalmers holds a B.S. in engineering from Stanford University and an M.F.A. in painting from the Royal College of Art, London. Her work has been exhibited around the world and featured by prestigious outlets. Two books have been published on her work: Food Chain and American Cockroach. Chalmers has won Best Experimental Short at SXSW Film Festival and Best Environmental Short at the Natourale Film Festival, received a Guggenheim Fellowship, and been awarded a Rauschenberg Residency; she was also a fellow at the Nevada Museum of Art’s Center for Art + Environment. In 2018, she created and taught a course called Art & Environmental Engagement at Stanford University.

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Schedule

Monday, January 14 & Tuesday, January 15

Grantee & Photographer Workshops | Private Event

 

Tuesday, January 15 | 5 PM Screening | 6:30 PM - 8 PM program

JAY MYSELF: A conversation with Stephen Wilkes and Jay Maisel | SOLD OUT
Renowned photographers and artists Jay Maisel and Stephen Wilkes will share stories about their work, lives, and friendship. They’ll also discuss the making of Wilkes’s documentary, Jay Myself, and show clips from this powerful film about Maisel’s reluctant, monumental move out of his 100-year-old landmark Manhattan home. Conversation moderated by Kathryn Keane, VP, Public Experiences, National Geographic Society.

 

Wednesday, January 16 | 1 PM - 5 PM

Storytelling Symposium | Invite Only | Live Stream
Innovative and excellent storytelling drives change and leads to the creation of a planet in balance. At a time when reliable journalism and photojournalism is increasingly devalued, we invest in and celebrate the best impact-driven storytellers. Hear from these journalists, photographers, filmmakers, and data vizualizers inspiring audiences and helping to convey the importance of nature and culture.

1 PM
Welcome by Tracy R. Wolstencroft, President & CEO, National Geographic Society

1:15 PM
Virtual Conservation: Inspiring Action for the Unseen
Aaron Huey

1:30 PM
Exposing the Boundaries of Climate Change
Pete Muller, Xaquín Veira González, and Arati Kumar-Rao
Moderated by Gael Almeida

2:15 PM
Capturing Tiny Stories with Major Impact
David Liittschwager and Caitlin Bailey in conversation with Alex Moen

2:40 PM
Break

2:55 PM
Photographing Hope
Ami Vitale

3:15 PM
Breaking the Fourth Wall of Storytelling
Dominic Bracco II, Tara Roberts, and Walé Oyéjidé
Moderated by Kaitlin Yarnall

4:05 PM
Bringing the Work Home
Andrea Bruce and Tomas Ayuso in conversation with Laurel Chor

4:50 PM
The Journey to Trans-Humanism
Albert Lin

4:55 PM
The Impact of Storytelling
Kaitlin Yarnall, Senior Vice President, Storytelling, National Geographic Society

 

Thursday, January 17 | 9 AM – 5 PM

Photography Seminar | Invite Only
An unforgettable day filled with fascinating stories from renowned and award-winning photographers from around the world. Witness the power of photography as our speakers delve into issues of identity, threats to the planet, and who holds the power in today’s society.

9 AM
Welcome by Vincent J. Musi, Master of Ceremonies
Remarks by Tracy R. Wolstencroft, President & CEO, National Geographic Society

9:15 AM
Maggie Steber and Lynn Johnson in conversation with Susan Goldberg
Alexandra Bell

10:30 AM
Break

10:45 AM
Catherine Chalmers
Kiliii Yüyan
Brent Stirton in conversation with Kate Brooks

12:15 PM
Lunch Break

2 PM
Remarks by Sarah Leen, Director of Photography, SVP, National Geographic Magazine and Partners

2:15 PM
Berndnaut Smilde
Adriana Zehbrauskas
Joshua Rashaad McFadden
Émilie Régnier
Sohei Nishino

4:00 PM
Break

4:15 PM
Taryn Simon in conversation with Shannon Simon

Interested in Attending?

The National Geographic Storytellers Summit is by invitation only. If you are interested in attending in the future, please register your interest.

 

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Photographs by: Brent Stirton, Getty Images reportage, Ami Vitale