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Teaching Resources

British Columbia

An ecosystem of stakeholders

Photograph by Meaghan Calcari Campbell

 

British Columbia, specifically its coast, is one of Canada’s most vibrant and diverse regions. Home to a broad spectrum of marine and terrestrial species, its ecosystems remain rich and vital to the survival of the region. The natural environment houses species such as the Grey wolf, salmon, and Kermode bear, while First Nations communities such as the Gitga’at and Haisla comprise the human environment. Each survives because of the unique ecosystem and land-sea relationship this region has helped cultivate, and each remains a stakeholder in the well-being of the coastal territory.

These educational materials allow students to experience the lives of those species living along the coast of British Columbia and the Great Bear Rainforest. Our activities introduce the concept of a pipeline as a way to transport oil from the Alberta oil sands to the marine terminal in Kitimat. By looking through the eyes of stakeholders, students delve into the consequences of constructing such a device through this ecosystem. What does it impact? Who does it benefit? By engaging in human and natural world perspectives, students will develop an understanding of how important decisions about real world are measured and made.


Classroom Resources

Making a Decision about the Construction of an Oil Pipeline through British Columbia

Making a Decision about the Construction of an Oil Pipeline through British Columbia  

(Grades 9–12) Students will analyze a real-world environmental case of building an oil pipeline through British Columbia. They will explore the geographical, cultural, and environmental context of building the pipeline, identify the stakeholders and their role and impact, and map out the intended and unintended consequences of the decision they make.

Great Bear Sea

Great Bear Sea   

(Grades 4-7 and 11-12) The content of these guides is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not represent the official views of National Geographic Education. Engage students in an inquiry-based exploration of the themes of Indigenous Knowledge, collaborative science, marine planning and stewardship, biodiversity, and sustainable resource management. 


Extend the Learning

Ocean Education Collection

Ocean Education Collection  

Bring engaging and important ocean learning to your classroom with resources on topics such as ocean life, human-ocean interactions, and the ocean’s physical geography.

 

Stand-Up Projects

Stand-Up Projects  

Coastal Canadian school draws on First Nations heritage for innovative woodworking projects and community involvement.

Rain Forests

Rain Forests  

National Geographic’s encyclopedic entry on Earth’s rain forests.

Stakeholder Consequences Decision Making

Stakeholder Consequences Decision Making  

A professional development resource that supports teachers in developing students' decision-making skills, specifically how to make informed environmental decisions.

Making Informed Environmental Decisions

Making Informed Environmental Decisions  

Students use a decision-making process to explore the complex nature of real-world environmental conflicts and how they get resolved.

Learning to Make Systematic Decisions

Learning to Make Systematic Decisions  

This article describes a decision-making process called Stakeholder Consequences Decision-Making, which helps students develop the skills they need to become informed and effective decision-makers.


Mapping British Columbia

British Columbia 1-Page Map

British Columbia 1-Page Map  

Download, print, or customize this map of British Columbia to explore with your class.

A Changing Pacific Coast

A Changing Pacific Coast  

This infographic depicts one of Earth’s most productive marine ecosystems.

Claiming British Columbia

Claiming British Columbia  

Use the National Geographic Magazine British Columbia map in your classroom.