search
search
Watch Online

Two Special Presentations

Highlighting the Power of Photography to Change the World

Promotional image for Photography Seminar 2018 events
Composite image. Photographs by Carol Guzy and Michael Nichols

This year, we invite you to watch two powerful events – Protecting Gabon and our Photography Seminar – that highlight how combining photography, science, and storytelling can inspire people to act, empower new conservation movements, and make a measurable impact on our planet.

Thursday, January 11
David Doubilet, 11:45 a.m. ET

Once a year, the world’s most inspirational photographers gather at National Geographic’s headquarters in Washington, DC to connect, share their passion and art, and to celebrate the power photography has in changing the world. You can watch the keynote presentations live, featuring Carol Guzy in conversation with Maggie Steber and David Doubilet in conversation with Jimmy Chin. Hear how these passionate and inspirational artists are using photography to help make a difference in the world.

Thursday, January 11
Carol Guzy, 4:15 p.m. ET

Once a year, the world’s most inspirational photographers gather at National Geographic’s headquarters in Washington, DC to connect, share their passion and art, and to celebrate the power photography has in changing the world. You can watch the keynote presentations live, featuring Carol Guzy in conversation with Maggie Steber and David Doubilet in conversation with Jimmy Chin. Hear how these passionate and inspirational artists are using photography to help make a difference in the world.

Tuesday, January 9
6:30 p.m.  - 8:00 p.m. ET

Ecologist and conservationists Mike Fay, award-winning photographer Nick Nichols, and writer David Quammen reflect on the massive undertaking that was the 1999 African Megatransect project. This arduous, 3,000 mile expedition tested the limits of human endurance and was a monumental turning point in conservation, inspiring other bold initiatives to meticulously explore and document the globe’s wildest and least-understood places and to show governments why they deserve protection.


Sponsored By