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National Geographic
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Talk

When Women Ruled the World

When
March 7, 2019, 7:30 PM - 9 PM
Price
$30
Talk

When Women Ruled the World

When
March 7, 2019, 7:30 PM - 9 PM
Price
$30

Photograph by Emory Kristof

About this Event

Female rulers are a rare phenomenon—but thousands of years ago in ancient Egypt, women reigned supreme. Queens like Hatshepsut, Nefertiti, and Cleopatra controlled the totalitarian state as power-brokers and rulers. But throughout human history, women in positions of power were more often used as political pawns in a male-dominated society. What was so special about ancient Egypt that provided women this kind of access to the highest political office? What was it about these women that allowed them to transcend patriarchal obstacles? What did Egypt gain from its liberal reliance on female leadership, and could today's world learn from its example?

Celebrated Egyptologist Kara Cooney will deliver a fascinating tale of female power through the lives of six remarkable pharaohs—women who ruled with real authority. She’ll shine a piercing light on perceptions of women in power, exploring why it has seldom been allowed through history and why that is relevant today.  

Learn more about ancient Egypt’s female rulers, and see over 350 prestigious artifacts from the days of the Egyptian Empire, in our new multisensory exhibition “Queens of Egypt.”

  • Gilbert H. Grosvenor Auditorium

    National Geographic Campus

Featuring

Photograph courtesy of Kara Cooney

Kara Cooney

Speaker

A professor of Egyptology at UCLA, KARA COONEY specializes in social history, gender studies, and economies in the ancient world. Her current research in coffin reuse provides an up-close look at the socioeconomic and political turmoil that affected even funerary and burial practices in ancient Egypt. This project has taken her around the world over 10 years to study and document nearly 300 coffins in various collections. Her first trade book, The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut’s Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt, released in 2014, is an illuminating biography of its least-well-known female king. Kara also produced a comparative archaeology television series for the Discovery Channel called Out of Egypt, which aired in 2009, and was co-curator of "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 2005.

Queens of Egypt
Upcoming Exhibition

Queens of Egypt  

Get to know such legendary queens as Nefertari, Nefertiti, and Hatshepsut; see more than 350 prestigious objects, and tour one of the most well-preserved tombs in the Valley of the Queens.

Coming Soon 

Plan Your Visit

Parking

Tickets to evening and weekend National Geographic live events in D.C. include free parking in our underground garage, located on M Street between 16th and 17th Streets NW. You must show proof of purchase to access the garage. Parking opens one hour before the event start time. For Nat Geo Nights events, parking opens at 5:00 P.M.

Parking is not available for museum or 3D film ticket holders. For museum ticket holders looking to park near the museum, Parking Panda or SpotHero can help you find parking nearby.

Bikes

The League of American Bicyclists has named National Geographic a silver Bicycle Friendly Business. For evening and weekend events, bicycle parking is available on level P-1 of the garage and at bike racks on M Street. For weekday daytime events, parking is available only at the bike racks located on M Street.

Directions

Driving Directions

National Geographic headquarters is located at 17th and M Streets, NW. The museum and store entrance is at 1145 17th Street; the Grosvenor Auditorium entrance is at 1600 M Street NW.

 

 

National Geographic is committed to promoting the use of sustainable transportation as a way to reduce local traffic congestion and air pollution. Please consider some of the District’s alternative transportation options:

By MetroRail

National Geographic is located a few blocks from the Farragut North Metro Station on the Metro’s Red Line. From the L Street Metro exit, head east on L Street toward 17th Street. Make a left on 17th Street. The museum will be on the right. Alternatively, take the Blue, Orange, or Silver Line to Farragut West. Exit the station at 17th Street NW, make a right out of the metro, turn left on 17th Street, and walk two blocks. The museum will be on the right. Visit the Metro website for more station information.

By MetroBus

A dozen MetroBus routes have stops located within a 1/4 mile of National Geographic, including the D1/3/5/6, N2/4/6, and the 42. To find the route closest to you, visit the Metro website.

By DC Circulator

The DC Circulator has one stop within walking distance of National Geographic. The Georgetown-Union Station route has a stop on K Street and Connecticut Avenue. From there, walk east on K Street and turn left on 17th Street. Walk one and a half more blocks and the museum will be on the right. For more information, visit www.dccirculator.com.

Capital Bikeshare

The District’s bike-sharing program makes bicycles available to anyone. Simply take a bike from one of over 115 stations in D.C. and Arlington, and return it to a docking station close to the museum. The closest docking stations to the museum are located at K and 17th Streets and 17th Street and Rhode Island Avenue. For more information about fees and station locations, visit: www.capitalbikeshare.com.

Accessibility

A wheelchair ramp is located on the M Street side of the museum’s main building. Automatic doors are on the 17th Street side. Wheelchairs are available at the ticket desk on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Please call the National Geographic Ticket Office at 202-857-7700 at least two weeks prior to your visit to request sign language interpretation, captioning, or hearing assistance devices.

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