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National Geographic
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Conversation

Expand the Field

When
February 11, 2019, 7:30 PM - 9 PM
Price
$25
Conversation

Expand the Field

When
February 11, 2019, 7:30 PM - 9 PM
Price
$25

Photograph by Mark Thiessen

About this Event

For more than 130 years, National Geographic has expanded the understanding of our planet and beyond by supporting a diverse group of bold people and their transformative ideas. Join us, on the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, for a special night with some of our amazing explorers—linguistic anthropologist Sandhya Narayanan, paleoanthropologist and stand-up comic Ella Al-Shamahi, oceanographer Katy Croff Bell, and carnivore ecologist Rae Wynn-Grant—who are pushing the boundaries of scientific knowledge, building a diverse community of innovators, and inspiring the next generation of changemakers.

  • Gilbert H. Grosvenor Auditorium

    National Geographic Campus

Featuring

Photograph by Christine Jean Chambers

Rae Wynn-Grant

Speaker

RAE WYNN-GRANT, Ph.D., is a large carnivore ecologist with expertise in using emerging technology to identify how humans are changing the way carnivores use landscapes. She is currently studying the drivers of human-carnivore conflict and how human development can either facilitate or disrupt connectivity of carnivore habitat. She is carrying out this work in the Great Plains of northeast Montana where she is studying potential habitat corridors that can aid in grizzly bear conservation. She has worked on similar research with black bears in the Western Great Basin, African lions in rural Kenya and Tanzania, and grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Rae is a National Geographic Society fellow and a visiting scientist at the American Museum of Natural History.


Katy Croff Bell

Speaker

Ocean explorer KATY CROFF BELL, Ph.D., has spent nearly 20 years using deep-sea technology to discover what lies at the depths of the ocean. The founder of the Open Ocean initiative at the MIT Media Lab, she is vice chair of the Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee and a fellow at the National Geographic Society. She was a 2001 John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, a 2006 National Geographic Emerging Explorer, and a 2014 MIT Media Lab Director’s Fellow. Previously, as executive vice president of the Ocean Exploration Trust, Katy led the development of exploration, research, and educational outreach activities for E/V Nautilus, including the management of scientists, engineers, educators, and students from 30+ countries working together to conduct telepresence-enabled expeditions around the world.

Photograph courtesy of Katy Croff Bell


Photograph courtesy of Mark Thiessen

Ella Al-Shamahi

Speaker

National Geographic Explorer ELLA AL-SHAMAHI is a paleoanthropologist and archaeologist specializing in Neanderthals—and a stand-up comic. She searches for fossils in caves in disputed, hostile, and unstable territories and believes that large parts of the planet’s potential contribution to science are overlooked due to instability. She has worked in Iraq and Yemen, among other places, and is currently focusing her attention on Socotra, a Yemeni island and UNESCO World Heritage Site. Recent fighting in Yemen has resulted in wide-scale but little-reported destruction, which she is trying to highlight. Using comedy to communicate science, she performs internationally, including at Edinburgh Festival Fringe. A Ph.D. candidate, Ella is also a BBC presenter. Her recent work includes a BBC/PBS/Wellcome Trust two-part documentary with Andy Serkis, which aimed to “re-brand” Neanderthals, and a documentary on the science of sleep.


Sandhya Narayanan

Speaker

Linguistic anthropologist and National Geographic Explorer SANDHYA NARAYANAN studies how language use and linguistic differences have shaped and continue to influence social and cultural changes in human populations. Her National Geographic Society grant funded her work studying indigenous language contact (how languages influence each other over time), multilingualism, and language and culture change along the Lake Titicaca basin on the Peru-Bolivia border—research she continues as a Ph.D. candidate in linguistic anthropology at the University of Michigan. Supported by a National Science Foundation grant, Sandhya studies Quechua-Aymara language contact in the region, including how social and political changes have affected not only both languages, but also their indigenous speakers and populations. She was part of the 2017 National Geographic Young Explorer Leadership and Development Program.

Photograph by Mark Thiessen

Plan Your Visit

Parking

Tickets to evening and weekend National Geographic live events in D.C. include free parking in our underground garage, located on M Street between 16th and 17th Streets NW. You must show proof of purchase to access the garage. Parking opens one hour before the event start time. For Nat Geo Nights events, parking opens at 5:00 P.M.

Parking is not available for museum or 3D film ticket holders. For museum ticket holders looking to park near the museum, Parking Panda or SpotHero can help you find parking nearby.

Bikes

The League of American Bicyclists has named National Geographic a silver Bicycle Friendly Business. For evening and weekend events, bicycle parking is available on level P-1 of the garage and at bike racks on M Street. For weekday daytime events, parking is available only at the bike racks located on M Street.

Directions

Driving Directions

National Geographic headquarters is located at 17th and M Streets, NW. The museum and store entrance is at 1145 17th Street; the Grosvenor Auditorium entrance is at 1600 M Street NW.

 

 

National Geographic is committed to promoting the use of sustainable transportation as a way to reduce local traffic congestion and air pollution. Please consider some of the District’s alternative transportation options:

By MetroRail

National Geographic is located a few blocks from the Farragut North Metro Station on the Metro’s Red Line. From the L Street Metro exit, head east on L Street toward 17th Street. Make a left on 17th Street. The museum will be on the right. Alternatively, take the Blue, Orange, or Silver Line to Farragut West. Exit the station at 17th Street NW, make a right out of the metro, turn left on 17th Street, and walk two blocks. The museum will be on the right. Visit the Metro website for more station information.

By MetroBus

A dozen MetroBus routes have stops located within a 1/4 mile of National Geographic, including the D1/3/5/6, N2/4/6, and the 42. To find the route closest to you, visit the Metro website.

By DC Circulator

The DC Circulator has one stop within walking distance of National Geographic. The Georgetown-Union Station route has a stop on K Street and Connecticut Avenue. From there, walk east on K Street and turn left on 17th Street. Walk one and a half more blocks and the museum will be on the right. For more information, visit www.dccirculator.com.

Capital Bikeshare

The District’s bike-sharing program makes bicycles available to anyone. Simply take a bike from one of over 115 stations in D.C. and Arlington, and return it to a docking station close to the museum. The closest docking stations to the museum are located at K and 17th Streets and 17th Street and Rhode Island Avenue. For more information about fees and station locations, visit: www.capitalbikeshare.com.

Accessibility

A wheelchair ramp is located on the M Street side of the museum’s main building. Automatic doors are on the 17th Street side. Wheelchairs are available at the ticket desk on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Please call the National Geographic Ticket Office at 202-857-7700 at least two weeks prior to your visit to request sign language interpretation, captioning, or hearing assistance devices.

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