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Conversation

Environmental Justice: Running Dry

When
October 16, 2018, 7:30 PM - 9 PM
Price
$25
Conversation

Environmental Justice: Running Dry

When
October 16, 2018, 7:30 PM - 9 PM
Price
$25

Photograph by Lynn Johnson

About this Event

Our lives depend on having access to clean, safe water, but forces from climate change to politics to human activity are leading to water crises around the world. In our ongoing series on environmental justice, join moderator and journalist Naveena Sadasivam, author and historian John F. Ross, environmental health scientist Jalonne L. White-Newsome, water policy expert Radhika Fox, and environmental scientist Samantha Chisholm Hatfield as they explore the history of and solutions to this critical issue.

  • Gilbert H. Grosvenor Auditorium

    National Geographic Campus

Featuring

Photograph by Marissa Rauch Photography

Radhika Fox

Speaker

RADHIKA FOX is the chief executive officer of the US Water Alliance, a nonprofit advancing national policies and programs that build a sustainable water future for all. In addition to her leadership at the US Water Alliance, Radhika is on the board of directors of PolicyLink, a nonprofit focused on creating sustainable communities of opportunity that allow everyone to participate and prosper. With a master’s in city and regional planning, Radhika has over 20 years of experience in developing policies, programs, and issue-based advocacy campaigns. She previously directed the policy and government affairs agenda for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. She has also served as the federal policy director at PolicyLink, where she coordinated the organization’s policy agenda on a wide range of issues, including infrastructure investment, transportation, sustainable communities, economic inclusion, and workforce development.


Jalonne L. White-Newsome

Speaker

JALONNE L. WHITE-NEWSOME, Ph.D, is senior program officer at The Kresge Foundation, responsible for the Environment Program’s grant portfolio on Climate Resilient & Equitable Water Systems (CREWS). She also leads part of the foundation’s work addressing the intersection of climate change and public health and is an adjunct professor at George Washington University. Previously, Jalonne served as director of federal policy at West Harlem Environmental Action. Her work helped ensure that the concerns of low-income communities of color were integrated into federal policy, particularly on clean air, climate change, and health issues. A member of the National Academy of Sciences Board on Environmental Change and Society, Jalonne also serves on the board of US Climate Action Network, is a steering committee member of the Health & Environmental Funders Network, and is a 2017 PLACES Fellow with the Funders Network.

Photograph courtesy of Jalonne L. White-Newsome


Photograph courtesy of Samantha Chisholm Hatfield

Samantha Chisholm Hatfield

Speaker

Environmental scientist SAMANTHA CHISHOLM HATFIELD, Ph.D., is an enrolled member of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, from the Tututni and Chinook bands. She is also Cherokee. Samantha’s areas of specialization include indigenous Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK), indigenous peoples’ cultural adaptations related to climate change, and Native American culture issues. She’s spoken on the national and international levels, including at the National Congress of American Indians, Northwest Climate Conference, International Conference on Jeju Haenyeo (Women Divers), and TEDxSalem. She’s also helped coordinate tribal participation for the Northwest Climate Science Center and Oregon State University’s Climate Boot Camp workshops. Samantha’s other projects include a children’s book on bullying and Native American identity, a book on TEK, and an anthology of compiled creative works. She is the co-owner of BearFoot Lacrosse, a nonprofit that helps disadvantaged youths learn sports.


John F. Ross

Speaker

JOHN F. ROSS, a former editor at American Heritage and Smithsonian magazines, recently wrote The Promise of the Grand Canyon: John Wesley Powell’s Perilous Journey and His Vision for the American West. His previous books include Enduring Courage: Ace Pilot Eddie Rickenbacker and the Dawn of the Age of Speed and War on the Run: The Epic Story of Robert Rogers and the Conquest of America’s First Frontier, which won the Fort Ticonderoga Award for Contributions to American History.

Photograph courtesy of John Ross


Photograph courtesy of Naveena Sadasivam

Naveena Sadasivam

Speaker

NAVEENA SADASIVAM is a staff writer covering the environment, energy, and climate change at the Texas Observer. Prior to joining the Observer, she wrote about the coal industry for InsideClimate News and fracking for ProPublica. At ProPublica, she was part of a team that reported on the water woes of the West, a project that was a 2016 Pulitzer Prize finalist for national reporting. She has a degree in chemical engineering and a master’s in environmental and science reporting from New York University and was a 2016 Ida B. Wells Fellow at The Investigative Fund, a project of The Nation Institute.


Plan Your Visit

Parking

Tickets to evening and weekend National Geographic live events in D.C. include free parking in our underground garage, located on M Street between 16th and 17th Streets NW. You must show proof of purchase to access the garage. Parking opens one hour before the event start time. For Nat Geo Nights events, parking opens at 5:00 P.M.

Parking is not available for museum or 3D film ticket holders. For museum ticket holders looking to park near the museum, Parking Panda or SpotHero can help you find parking nearby.

Bikes

The League of American Bicyclists has named National Geographic a silver Bicycle Friendly Business. For evening and weekend events, bicycle parking is available on level P-1 of the garage and at bike racks on M Street. For weekday daytime events, parking is available only at the bike racks located on M Street.

Directions

Driving Directions

National Geographic headquarters is located at 17th and M Streets, NW. The museum and store entrance is at 1145 17th Street; the Grosvenor Auditorium entrance is at 1600 M Street NW.

 

 

National Geographic is committed to promoting the use of sustainable transportation as a way to reduce local traffic congestion and air pollution. Please consider some of the District’s alternative transportation options:

By MetroRail

National Geographic is located a few blocks from the Farragut North Metro Station on the Metro’s Red Line. From the L Street Metro exit, head east on L Street toward 17th Street. Make a left on 17th Street. The museum will be on the right. Alternatively, take the Blue, Orange, or Silver Line to Farragut West. Exit the station at 17th Street NW, make a right out of the metro, turn left on 17th Street, and walk two blocks. The museum will be on the right. Visit the Metro website for more station information.

By MetroBus

A dozen MetroBus routes have stops located within a 1/4 mile of National Geographic, including the D1/3/5/6, N2/4/6, and the 42. To find the route closest to you, visit the Metro website.

By DC Circulator

The DC Circulator has one stop within walking distance of National Geographic. The Georgetown-Union Station route has a stop on K Street and Connecticut Avenue. From there, walk east on K Street and turn left on 17th Street. Walk one and a half more blocks and the museum will be on the right. For more information, visit www.dccirculator.com.

Capital Bikeshare

The District’s bike-sharing program makes bicycles available to anyone. Simply take a bike from one of over 115 stations in D.C. and Arlington, and return it to a docking station close to the museum. The closest docking stations to the museum are located at K and 17th Streets and 17th Street and Rhode Island Avenue. For more information about fees and station locations, visit: www.capitalbikeshare.com.

Accessibility

A wheelchair ramp is located on the M Street side of the museum’s main building. Automatic doors are on the 17th Street side. Wheelchairs are available at the ticket desk on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Please call the National Geographic Ticket Office at 202-857-7700 at least two weeks prior to your visit to request sign language interpretation, captioning, or hearing assistance devices.

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